Civilian Conservation Corps
Preserving American's Natural Resources
1933 - 1942

CCC Legacy Current Notes of Interest

This web site is under construction. 

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Welcome to the updated CCC Legacy website.  

 

Even steady dependable technology gets outdated over the years and we were required to move on to “bigger and better” technology.  “Bigger and better” is sometimes up for debate, but we will keep going forward.

 

Sharing the news about CCC heritage is one of our primary organizational goals.  CCC Legacy is a membership organization and it is the members who create success for the group.  Without members we would not exist.  Please become a member and support this great piece of American history.

 

If you have something that you would like to share, please let us know. 

 

Joan Sharpe

Camp Roosevelt - April 17, 1933
Camp Roosevelt , George Washington National Forest- First CCC Camp in America, April 17, 1933

America was in the grip of the Great Depression when Franklin Delano Roosevelt was inaugurated in March of 1933.  More than twenty-five percent of the population was unemployed, hungry and without hope.  The New Deal Programs instituted bold changes in the federal government that energized the economy and created an equilibrium that helped to bolster the needs of citizens. 

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Go to Membership page. Membership

Out of the economic chaos emerged the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). The goal was two-fold:  conservation of our natural resources and the salvage of our young men.  The CCC is recognized as the single greatest conservation program in American and it served as a catalyst to develop the very tenets of modern conservation.  The work of America’s young men dramatically changed the future and today we still enjoy a legacy of natural resource treasurers that dot the American landscape.  

Co. 322, NF-1 VA - First Camp in the Nation
Camp Roosevelt Entrance Sign - 1937
Create by George "Bud" Bush
Artwork by CCC alumnus George "Bud" Bush